Jump to Content

The Joyce Foundation 2011 Year in Review

Message from the President

In a period such as this, marked by extreme political partisanship and apparent gridlock at the federal level, it would be tempting to throw up one’s hands in frustration.

After all, the magnitude of the challenges our country faces is huge, and the solutions far from evident.

But this is just the time that a foundation like Joyce can add the most value — because we are non-partisan, not subject to the pressures of political and business cycles, and have the freedom to explore new ideas and support projects that others cannot or will not take on.

So, we are optimistic that we can make a difference, though we do know it is important to pick our battles wisely. This year, we think it paid off to focus our attention on policy at the state and local levels, where we saw some really important progress and where we saw tangible improvements in the quality of life for people in the Great Lakes region, some of whom you’ll meet in this annual report.

One great example was our successful effort in the Education program to build a case for policy change which cynics thought was impossible: to reform the rules in Illinois governing teacher evaluation, tenure, dismissal, and layoffs. We know that good teachers are…continue reading President’s Letter >

Audio Source: StoryCorps National Teachers Initiative

Education

Students in the Great Lakes region and throughout the country need to graduate high school prepared for their futures. Unfortunately, more than half either fail to graduate on time or graduate unprepared for college-level work. African American and Latino young people are disproportionately impacted by this stark reality. The Joyce Foundation aims to turn this around through innovative policies and programs that close achievement gaps by improving teacher quality and early reading skills.

Students and parents know—and the research makes clear—that children learn best when they have good teachers. So how can we make sure that our schools hire good teachers, hold onto them, and help them flourish?

Illinois took a huge step in 2011 toward answering that question. Landmark legislation shifted school personnel decisions from factors like tenure and seniority to performance. Quality teaching, measured in part by how well students are learning, will now be central to decisions about tenure, layoffs, and dismissal.

Indiana enacted similar legislation, requiring teacher evaluations to include measures of student achievement and tying pay and tenure to performance.

The Indiana legislation was contentious, but Illinois passed the new law with broad bipartisan majorities. Behind the Illinois legislation lay months of work by public officials, union leaders, and Joyce grantees. Illinois teachers, working through Advance Illinois’ Educator Advisory Council, in addition to the state’s teachers union, the Center for Teaching Quality, and Teach Plus, helped shape the recommendations. Union leaders Dan Montgomery and Ken Swanson joined Joyce President Ellen S. Alberding in praising the new law for making Illinois “the new leader in education reform.”

“It might be a little daunting at first, all the reforms and changes, but really overall I think we’re moving in the right direction, especially around accountability and shared responsibility,” said Brussels, IL teacher Melissa Sievers of the Educator Advisory Council. “Teachers want excellence—they just want to make sure [what we do] is fair,” added retired teacher Carol Broos of Northbrook. “People are ready for change.”

Getting evaluation right

The linchpin of improving teacher quality is making evaluation meaningful, so that principals understand how well teachers are performing and give them good, timely feedback to improve their practice. The 2011 Illinois law built on 2010 legislation which requires school districts, starting this fall, to set up new evaluations for teachers and principals using multiple measures, including how well their students learn. Critical input for reworking the evaluations came in the form of a 2011 Joyce-funded report by the Consortium on Chicago School Research at the University of Chicago.

The Consortium found a promising model in a four-year-old Chicago Public Schools pilot project, in which principals observed in classrooms twice yearly and then discussed their findings with teachers. Ratings were based on shared definitions of effective teaching as codified in the highly regarded “Danielson Framework,” which looks for good relationships between teachers and students as well as evidence that students are intellectually engaged and taking responsibility for their own learning. Both teachers and principals in the pilot commented that their discussions were “more objective and reflective” than in the past, and more focused on improving instructional practice. And the evaluation ratings matched student performance—that is, highly rated teachers in the pilot had students who performed well on achievement tests, while the opposite held for poorly rated teachers.

Those findings suggest that the pilot project can be a good model for Illinois districts setting up their own evaluation systems, and for other districts nationally as well. Already, CPS has unveiled its new evaluation system, which centers on classroom observation based on the Danielson Framework, along with student academic growth and student feedback. Still, the Consortium study made clear that principals and teachers must understand and buy into the shared framework for it to be effective. Pulling that off will be critical in the months ahead.

Related Links

The Joyce Foundation Education Program

Source: Minnesota House of Representatives, House Public Information Services

Employment

Nationally, and in the Great Lakes region, governments, businesses, educational institutions, and community organizations are developing critical skill-building programs to advance low-income adults to higher paying jobs. These programs can empower students with basic and technical skills for new, better-paying jobs that can transform their lives and support their families. The Joyce Foundation works to improve education systems and support opportunities for adult students to learn important skills and pursue good-paying jobs in their communities.

Noe Velazquez works in a plastics factory. Age 29 and engaged, he’d like a better paying job with a future. He sees ads for machine operator jobs in Chicago’s western suburbs where he lives. But with only a GED, limited English, and no computer skills, he doesn’t qualify.

Velazquez heard about a program at Elgin Community College tailored for people exactly like him. He gets classes and factory-floor training in using computers to read blueprints and other skills, leading to a certificate in Computer Numerical Control. An ESL teacher sits in on the classes, then works with Velazquez and other Spanish-speaking students to make sure they’re on top of the material. “Sometimes you didn’t get something that other people got, so you can ask about it,” says Velazquez. “Plus in this class we cover a little bit of everything—how to speak, how to write, doing interviews. That’s been great for us.”

Putting the pieces together

The Elgin program Velazquez attends follows a promising new model for improving the job prospects of low-skilled workers. Pioneered in Washington State, the model combines classroom and onsite training with adult basic education in literacy and other skills, all geared to real job opportunities. Evaluation showed that the program succeeded at helping students, specifically helping those without a high school diploma or GED earn more college credits, certificates, find employment and earn a higher wage than their peers who pursued traditional GED programs.

With support from the Joyce Foundation and other major national funders, the Boston-based nonprofit Jobs for the Future is embarking on a major national demonstration project to implement such programs in several states and evaluate the results. The project, called Accelerating Opportunity, will enroll over 18,000 students in five to six states, with 40 plus participating colleges. The goal: dramatically increase the number of college credentials earned by adult learners students.

“We’re trying to address the substantial educational barriers that prevent millions of adults from getting the skills and education they need to get family-supporting jobs,” says Project Director Barbara Endel. “We help states and colleges redesign the way they work with underprepared students to accelerate the time and the sequence of getting credentials.”

Under the Illinois initiative Elgin and seven other community colleges were invited to set up programs that give students clear career pathways to local jobs, based on labor market information. JFF works with the states on programmatic design and policy changes, including funding, to get the programs up and running and expand them to other parts of the system. The Urban Institute is evaluating the results.

Shifting Gears

The focus on state policy change draws on the insights of the Foundation’s five-year Shifting Gears initiative, which wrapped up in 2011. The initiative worked with Midwestern states to promote policies and innovation in adult education, workforce development and postsecondary education to help low-skilled workers earn postsecondary credentials that lead to good jobs and boost the regional economy. A 2010 progress report showed significant policy changes underway in several states. A formal evaluation is coming out in Fall 2012.

In particular, the Shifting Gears effort in Minnesota, called FastTRAC, has gained broad acceptance from the Governor, the workforce investment board, state colleges and universities, and state departments responsible for education, welfare, and economic development. Federal, state and private sources have funded courses that, like the Elgin course Velazquez attends, integrate basic skills and postsecondary education leading to credentials and good jobs.

A participant who earned a Nursing Assistant Certificate, Antoinette McCarthy, was called out in Governor Mark Dayton’s 2012 State of the State. “Her hard work for that certificate means she will earn, on average, nearly double what someone would at a minimum-wage medical job,” the governor said. He added: “We need FastTRAC on every campus in Minnesota. We need state and federal job training and workforce development monies to be better coordinated with higher education funding and programs, so that all of our students come out of our educational systems skilled and ready to succeed. The success of our state depends upon it.”

Antoinette McCarthy is continuing on with her education toward an RN degree. Noe Velazquez, too, intends to pursue a degree once he’s earned his certificate. “It’s hard working and being a student, I don’t have a lot of free time,” Velazquez says. “But I think it will be worth it. It’s the sacrifice I have to make so I can get a better paid job.”

Related Links

The Joyce Foundation Employment Program

Chicago’s near Southwest Side, looking northeast. “The current derelict industrial corridor reserved for private uses is reclaimed as public space, becoming a vibrant new waterfront as beloved as Lake Michigan’s,” suggests Jeanne Gang in Reverse Effect: Reviving Chicago’s Waterways. “The riverfront becomes a place for living, working, growing, creating, and other environmentally friendly and economically vital uses.”

Environment

Clean air, drinkable water, and a stable climate depend on responsible action from governments, businesses, and individuals. To inform and encourage responsible action, the Joyce Foundation seeks common-sense, cost-effective environmental improvements in the Midwest—starting with protecting the Great Lakes and saving energy.

A century ago, Chicagoans were getting sick because the city’s sewage was fouling its drinking water, Lake Michigan. So city leaders undertook a massive public works project to reverse the flow of the Chicago River and send the sewage downstream via the Mississippi River system. It was one of many infrastructure investments—draining wetlands, building canals, excavating the Deep Tunnel—that created Chicago’s waterway system. These investments not only protected public health, they also enhanced Chicago’s strategic location as the hub of American agriculture, industry, and transportation in the 20th century.

Now, faced with another threat—Asian carp swimming up the rivers bringing potential devastation to the Great Lakes ecosystem—local, regional and national leaders are considering another major investment in Chicago’s waterways. This one would stop the carp and other invasives by cutting the connection between the rivers and the Lakes—thus undoing some of the earlier work. But, like their predecessors, advocates for this new investment put clean water and a healthy ecosystem, along with other quality of life issues like flood prevention and enhanced transportation, at the center of their mission.

The Joyce Foundation helped jumpstart the conversation in 2011 by funding the Great Lakes Commission and the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative to analyze the options. Restoring the Natural Divide, the groups’ joint report, identifies the costs, benefits, and timelines of three potential strategies for physically separating the Great Lakes from the Chicago River system.

Whatever option is chosen would mean a massive expenditure, ranging from $3.26–$9.54 billion, in a time of strapped public budgets. Preserving these waters, which communities across the Great Lakes region depend on, is essential and not doing so will cost more. Because the benefits of protecting the Lakes (and protecting the rivers from invasives coming downstream from the Great Lakes) are multistate, some of the investment would be needed from the U.S. government. The Army Corps of Engineers is currently studying options for preventing invasives from entering the Great Lakes, and has committed to including physical separation, as analyzed in the Joyce-funded report, as one of the options in its report to Congress. Other reactions to the report have been mostly positive—a significant achievement, given that other Great Lakes states have sued to force Illinois to close the waterway link.

Expanding the vision

Tim Eder of the Great Lakes Commission notes that local investments are already underway to enhance the Chicago River, complete the Deep Tunnel for handling storm water, and untangle local freight bottlenecks. Done properly, he argues, waterways separation could build on these investments to help Chicago increase recreational activities, improve both freight handling and flood control, and create a new waterway system for the new century.

Others are taking the opportunity one step further, by exploring how new waterway infrastructure can help revitalize communities on Chicago’s near Southwest Side and throughout the city as a whole. Architect Jeanne Gang, in collaboration with the Natural Resources Defense Council, led a yearlong re-envisioning process, partially supported by Joyce. The results are outlined in Reverse Effect: Renewing Chicago’s Waterways.

The decision to close two coal-fired power plants in the area, announced by Midwest Generation in early 2012, expands the possibilities. The closures resulted from years of pressure to clean up or close high-polluting plants led by Joyce grantees, including the Clean Air Task Force, Respiratory Health Association of Metropolitan Chicago, and the Illinois Environmental Council Education Fund. Now Joyce funding will support planning for reuse of the sites, led by the Delta Institute.

Long-term community development will be a tremendous benefit, but driving the conversation right now is the urgency of those fast-moving carp. “We have a responsibility as stewards to make sure these fish don’t cause major harm,” says Tim Eder. “Lake Michigan is tremendously valuable to Chicago residents. It’s a tremendous challenge to city residents to think how to manage water and waste. Residents and leaders need to have a serious adult conversation about how to manage all this. It’s a hundred-year conversation—the last one happened at the turn of the last century, and has served city and the region well. Now we’re talking about looking forward for next 100 years.”

Related Links

The Joyce Foundation Environment Program

Gun Violence Prevention

Every day, 270 people in America are shot in murders, assaults, suicides, accidents, and police intervention. 47 of them are children and teens. This adds up to nearly 100,000 Americans who are killed or injured by guns each year. The Joyce Foundation works with law enforcement, policy makers and advocates to reduce the toll of gun violence on families and communities.

In 2011 the Wisconsin Legislature voted to allow residents to carry concealed, loaded weapons in public places. So why are there signs all over the state saying “No Weapons Allowed”?

Because most Wisconsin residents don’t want guns in public places, says Jeri Bonavia’s of WAVE (Wisconsin Anti-Violence Effort), a Joyce grantee. When the legislature allowed them anyway, Bonavia’s group began distributing signs, and local residents began contacting public officials and businesses asking them to keep guns off their premises.

The signs are a visible demonstration of the power of Bonavia’s belief in listening to people, then giving them a way to act.

Concern about the presence of concealed, loaded firearms in public was common among Wisconsin residents. A WAVE poll showed that by a 3-1 margin state residents would feel less safe with concealed, loaded weapons in public places. Editorials from newspapers around the state supported WAVE’s position. In the end, despite the public opposition, legislators approved a version of the concealed carry law that mandated permits and training as prerequisites for carrying weapons in public, backing away from the original bill, which had no such restrictions.

Using stories to connect with people

Bonavia comes from a hunting family and a state where hunting is a proud tradition. (More people with guns take to Wisconsin woods on the opening weekend of the deer hunting season than hit the Normandy beaches on D Day.) But, she says, Wisconsin people are caring people, and they are appalled by stories of gun violence from their state, like the young man from Crandon who killed his ex-girlfriend and her friends at a homecoming party, the hunter trespassing on private land in northwest Wisconsin who turned his weapon on the landowner and his buddies, and the unemployed plumber who killed three teenagers swimming in the Menominee River.

“We spend many weekends out around the state, at farmers markets and festivals, hearing from people, giving them our ideas, really exchanging information,” says Bonavia. “It doesn’t matter what part of the state we’re in, people care about other people being shot. It matters to them. It’s universal. And they want to understand that there are real solutions that would not harm our traditions, our hunting culture.”

Mobilizing that sense of caring is what gives Bonavia power. That, and not giving up. The Legislature had legalized concealed loaded guns in “banks, churches, taverns, parks, hospitals, playgrounds, domestic violence shelters, grocery stores, universities, Lambeau Field, mental health facilities, school zones, and just about all other public places,” notes the WAVE website, but it also allowed businesses and local officials to keep guns out of their establishments.

“There was such an enormous backlash—it was far too extreme to the people of Wisconsin,” says Bonavia. So she and her group began distributing and posting their signs. Residents of local communities, meanwhile, contacted officials demanding that guns be kept out of public buildings. “All the communication we’ve received from the public, and there’s a good stack of it that’s on my desk tonight, has all said, ‘Please don’t allow it in city buildings,’” reported the Mayor of Appleton in a newspaper account. Wauwatosa officials reportedly got 59 e-mails in favor of barring weapons and one against. As of this writing, officials had responded to their residents’ concerns, banning guns from public buildings in counties where 80 percent of Wisconsin residents live.

Milton Mayor Tom Chesmore, a concealed carry advocate, was one of them. According to a story in the local newspaper, Chesmore, having watched video of a Florida man terrorizing a Florida school board meeting, now believes only police should carry guns into city buildings. “When you’re dealing with the safety of your city, your personal choices have to be put aside. Your decision’s got to be based on the safety of the people in your community.”

Related Links

The Joyce Foundation Gun Violence Prevention Program

Bayfield, Wisconsin resident Florence Hessing, 96, always votes, says her husband, Donald Mueller. “She just feels it’s her duty.”

Money and Politics

Recent polls show that more than two-thirds of Americans believe that the country is on the wrong track and four out of five are dissatisfied or angry with the federal government. More than one third of citizens do not vote. The Joyce Foundation aims to strengthen democracy by promoting campaign finance reforms, government openness and ethics, fair and competitive elections, an independent judiciary, and informed citizen participation.

Florence Hessing was born at home, in Iowa, back in 1916, before women had the right to vote. When she was three her family moved to the far northern Wisconsin community of Bayfield; the next year, the Nineteenth Amendment passed. Ms. Hessing, who worked as a rural mail-carrier, has been voting ever since she was old enough to cast a ballot. But when the Wisconsin Legislature in 2011 enacted a requirement that voters show photo IDs, she found herself disenfranchised—because she doesn’t have a photo ID or the birth certificate required to get one.

Disenfranchising citizens is a red flag to the League of Women Voters Education Fund, which was founded as an extension of the women’s suffrage movement. “The League has held for 92 years that voting is a fundamental citizen’s right which must be guaranteed,” says Andrea Kaminski, executive director of the Wisconsin League, a Joyce grantee.

The League challenged the voter ID law as a violation of the state’s constitution, which guarantees the vote to all U.S. citizens over 18 who are residents of the state except those who are incompetent or felons. A district court judge agreed. “The government may not disqualify an elector who possesses those qualifications on the grounds that the voter does not satisfy additional statutorily-created qualifications … such as a photo ID,” the judge ruled. Addressing the argument that voter IDs are necessary to prevent vote fraud, the judge wrote “voter fraud is no more poisonous to our democracy than voter suppression. Indeed, they are two heads on the same monster.”

The case is now working its way through state courts, while another lawsuit brought by the ACLU challenges the law in federal courts. In the meantime, the state judge in the League’s case has issued a permanent injunction blocking the photo ID requirement in this year’s elections.

Making it harder to vote

The Wisconsin law is not unique, nor is Hessing an isolated example. Similar state laws enacted recently around the country amount to “the tightening of restrictions on who can vote and how Americans can vote,” according to the Brennan Center for Justice. Besides requiring photo ID, states have set new requirements for voter registration, cut back on early voting, and reinstated barriers to people who have served prison time. Groups in the Midwest Democracy Network have been opposing many of the changes.

“The new laws could make it significantly harder for more than five million eligible voters to cast ballots in 2012,” says the Brennan Center. Its 2006 survey found that about 11% of US citizens lack a government-issued photo ID; percentages are higher among older people (18%) and African Americans (25%). In addition, about 13 million citizens, like Hessing, don’t have a birth certificate or other proof of citizenship. A 2005 University of Wisconsin study estimated that nearly a quarter of that state’s residents over 65 lack a photo ID (as do nearly 100,000 residents aged 35–64).

Besides challenging the Wisconsin law, the League of Women Voters has been helping people like Hessing get birth certificates and ballots, and observing at elections to make sure voting rights are upheld. They’ve been busy, because Wisconsin has been having nearly nonstop elections recently, including the primary, the upcoming general election, and also recall elections for state legislators and the governor over labor issues. “She really wanted in on that,” says Hessing’s husband, Donald Mueller. “She’s for the working man.”

“As long as I’m up and around I should be able to vote,” says Hessing. So far, thanks to the Wisconsin League of Women Voters, she can.

Related Links

The Joyce Foundation Money and Politics Program

Arts and Culture

The arts are an integral part of communities and a major contributor to the economy. The Joyce Foundation works to improve communities through the arts, support art that reflects the community, and make art accessible to diverse audiences.

Art does not always fit neatly into a box. It pushes boundaries and insists on new ways of thinking, listening, and seeing. But art is essential to community because it nurtures our spirits by taking us out of our daily lives, prodding us to question the world around us and opening ourselves up to the possibility of transformation.

Theaster Gates unites themes of community and transformation in his work, from his 2010 Joyce Award project at the Milwaukee Museum of Art to his current project, inviting neighbors to help him rebuild a foreclosed building on Chicago’s South Side as a library and community center, and then starting over on the building next door. Gates believes that making art and revitalizing communities have a lot in common with religion. The heat that reforms the molecular structure of clay, the urban planner’s ideas for improving cities, the religious imperative: “all are rooted in notions of transformation.”

Culture grant making at the Joyce Foundation has long emphasized the power of arts in our lives and therefore our communities. That has been embodied in grants to strengthen arts organizations in communities of color and to bring broader, more diverse audiences to the Midwest’s great cultural institutions. The Joyce Awards, now celebrating their tenth anniversary, have built in community engagement as a critical project element. Gates, for example, collaborated with workers at local ceramics factories in preparation for his homage to a 19th century African American potter at the Milwaukee Museum. William Pope L., a 2012 Joyce Award winner, will gather stories and photographs of Clevelanders for his project with SPACES gallery and assemble them into a video to be broadcast from a moving truck winding its way through city neighborhoods.

Going outside the walls

As the Joyce Awards enter their second decade, the Foundation is making even more explicit the connection between art and community by opening the awards not just to arts institutions but to any nonprofit organization. Community centers, churches, or any nonprofit that wants to work with an artist may apply.

At the same time, the Culture Program is launching an Innovation Fund to explore ways that technology can extend the reach of art and create opportunities for people to interact with it, and looking for new ways that art can support community revitalization. It’s part of a fundamental shift in perspective described by Senior Program Officer Angelique Power in a recent blog posting: “The world is large, and the majority of artists that are doing important, sophisticated, resonant work are outside of [art] institutions,” Power wrote. “People will continue to connect, engage, learn, and explore in ways and places meaningful to them (churches, schools, front porches, gardens, markets, sewing circles, block clubs). There is real discussion, reflection, enlightenment and engagement happening here.” The Joyce Foundation aims to be part of that engagement.

Related Links

The Joyce Foundation Arts and Culture Program

Special Opportunities

Recent polls show that more than two-thirds of Americans believe that the country is on the wrong track and four out of five are dissatisfied or angry with the federal government. More than one third of citizens do not vote. The Joyce Foundation aims to strengthen democracy by promoting campaign finance reforms, government openness and ethics, fair and competitive elections, an independent judiciary, and informed citizen participation.

Florence Hessing was born at home, in Iowa, back in 1916, before women had the right to vote. When she was three her family moved to the far northern Wisconsin community of Bayfield; the next year, the Nineteenth Amendment passed. Ms. Hessing, who worked as a rural mail-carrier, has been voting ever since she was old enough to cast a ballot. But when the Wisconsin Legislature in 2011 enacted a requirement that voters show photo IDs, she found herself disenfranchised—because she doesn’t have a photo ID or the birth certificate required to get one.

Disenfranchising citizens is a red flag to the League of Women Voters, which was founded as an extension of the women’s suffrage movement. “The League has held for 92 years that voting is a fundamental citizen’s right which must be guaranteed,” says Andrea Kaminski, executive director of the Wisconsin League, a Joyce grantee.

The League challenged the voter ID law as a violation of the state’s constitution, which guarantees the vote to all U.S. citizens over 18 who are residents of the state except those who are incompetent or felons. A district court judge agreed. “The government may not disqualify an elector who possesses those qualifications on the grounds that the voter does not satisfy additional statutorily-created qualifications … such as a photo ID,” the judge ruled. Addressing the argument that voter IDs are necessary to prevent vote fraud, the judge wrote “voter fraud is no more poisonous to our democracy than voter suppression. Indeed, they are two heads on the same monster.”

The case is now working its way through state courts, while another lawsuit brought by the ACLU challenges the law in federal courts. In the meantime, the state judge in the League’s case has issued a permanent injunction blocking the photo ID requirement in this year’s elections.

Making it harder to vote

The Wisconsin law is not unique, nor is Hessing an isolated example. Similar state laws enacted recently around the country amount to “the tightening of restrictions on who can vote and how Americans can vote,” according to the Brennan Center for Justice. Besides requiring photo ID, states have set new requirements for voter registration, cut back on early voting, and reinstated barriers to people who have served prison time. Groups in the Midwest Democracy Network have been opposing many of the changes.

“The new laws could make it significantly harder for more than five million eligible voters to cast ballots in 2012,” says the Brennan Center. Its 2006 survey found that about 11% of US citizens lack a government-issued photo ID; percentages are higher among older people (18%) and African Americans (25%). In addition, about 13 million citizens, like Hessing, don’t have a birth certificate or other proof of citizenship. A 2005 University of Wisconsin study estimated that nearly a quarter of that state’s residents over 65 lack a photo ID (as do nearly 100,000 residents aged 35–64).

Besides challenging the Wisconsin law, the League of Women Voters has been helping people like Hessing get birth certificates and ballots, and observing at elections to make sure voting rights are upheld. They’ve been busy, because Wisconsin has been having nearly nonstop elections recently, including the primary, the upcoming general election, and also recall elections for state legislators and the governor over labor issues. “She really wanted in on that,” says Hessing’s husband, Donald Mueller. “She’s for the working man.”

“As long as I’m up and around I should be able to vote,” says Hessing. So far, thanks to the Wisconsin League of Women Voters, she can.

Related Links

The Joyce Foundation Money and Politics Program